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Tuesday, July 18, 2006

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Itchy and Scratchy

I have a new note on my biology blog on why people itch.

Julian

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Friday, July 14, 2006

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Article reaffirms truths

I think this article by Dr Peter Chojnowski is interesting and deserves a wide readership.

Sample quote:

" It will be my contention that women have their being as women actualized only through their relationship with men. Women need men in order to be truly women. Men, however, do not need women in order to be truly men. "

I must say that I have noticed that women are relational beings, in a way that men aren't. I have known quite a lot of men who are classic "lone wolves", but a woman without several close friends is just about unknown.

Julian

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Another addition to my blogroll

Orbis Catholicus.

Julian

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Tuesday, July 11, 2006

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Catholics the New York Times actually likes

Steve Sailer complains that the New York Times has rediscovered the Spanish Catholic history of North America, and is using it to promote a pro-immigration argument. Much as I admire Steve's mental abilities and agree with him about many things, I think he has a blind spot here. It pains me to say it, but I think the New York Times is more-or-less right about this. And there is nothing terribly new about attempts by members of the Anglosphere Establishment to reconsider the "black legend" of Catholicism, including Spanish Catholicism. Back in 1975, John Kenneth Galbraith, attempted to debunk the anti-Spanish "black legend". See here, the extract from Chapter 2 on Spanish gold and silver from the Americas from Galbraith's "Money: Whence it came, where it went."

Also worth a look is "Blood-Drenched Altars: A Catholic Commentary on the History of Mexico." Bishop Kelley's book argues that it was anti-Catholic socialist governments that damaged Mexico.

I have noticed a tendency on the English national broadcaster, BBC, in recent years to give the Catholic side of history a much fairer hearing than would have been the case until quite recently. I suspect it is a case of political correctness encouraging those who regard themselves as progressive to identify with their traditional enemies so as to annoy conservatives in their midst. Same with the New York Times.

Julian

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Monday, July 10, 2006

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"Darwin Catholic"

Darwin Catholic - "where religion, philosophy and demographics meet" - looks interesting. I found out about it at the Gene Expression blog.

"Mr and Mrs Darwin" seem to richly deserve blogrolling.

The blog covers Catholicism and Darwinism, like mine.

Lawrence Auster has some interesting material on Darwinism and Liberalism at his blog here. His post, at View From the Right, is titled "How liberals make Darwinism seem compatible with liberal equality". A quote (which I have edited for clarity) from "Dana" at Auster's site:

" Almost all of the other advocates of evolution as it stands (particularly evolutionary psychology) today are of the Right in some manner, though usually more along the libertarian lines. Evolutionary psychology, for the non-leftist, stands as a bulwark against the forces [which] say [that] human conventions, traditions and taboos are arbitrary and [can] be tossed out at [a] whim with no consequences for the human condition. It gives a solid grounding in nature for upholding the traditional sexual mores, behavioral norms, marriage structures etc. that conservatives hold so dear. Don’t let the liberals fool you, they don’t believe in evolution, they just hate GOD. "

Another interesting post of Auster's, "God created inequality, and cultural differences that matter", focuses on an apocryphal book of the Bible, Ecclesiasticus. We Catholics actually get exposed to this book regularly, with a quote along these lines "My son, look after your father in his old age; do nothing to vex him as long as he lives. Even if his mind fails, make allowances for him, and do not despise him because you are in your prime." Auster's point is to stress that the Bible contains sections that emphasise spiritual distinctions and inequality; and that this aspect of Christianity is largely ignored these days. Certainly the idea of inequality willed by God is not to the forefront in modern Christianity, but among more Traditional Catholics such beliefs and understandings are not forgotten. There is an interesting agreement between traditional Christian beliefs about human difference and inequality and some modern strains of Darwinian thinking (evolutionary psychology or "sociobiology"). Recent Popes have emphasised the parts of Christian teaching that dwell on human equality; but there is a strong traditional case for human inequality in Catholic teaching, and in fact I suspect that Pope Benedict is less naively egalitarian than his predecessor.

Julian

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Friday, July 07, 2006

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New post on evolution of homosexuality in man

At my biology blog, Biology Notes.


Julian

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